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Idaho and Wyoming to see 80MPH signs soon

Texas and Utah are already there, and now some stretches of highway in Idaho and Wyoming could see 80mph limits coming their way soon.

Both states are trying to boost their 75mph highway limits up to 80mph in most areas.  Speed limit signs that say “speed limit 65” could also be replaced with ones that say “70”.  I think this definitely has most folks excited when it comes to their morning commute.

It’s no unknown fact that all production cars nowadays can hit 80mph.  And we won’t really know how this will affect traffic conditions and road accidents.

I do question why this won’t be the norm for other states in the U.S.  Yes, states like Massachusetts, New York and Florida would have a difficult time with it due to their dense population.  They definitely have a higher rate of highway traffic accidents compared to other states.  Lower populated states might have a better time with it.

Add 80mph limits to rural highways in states like Montana or Maine.  This really shouldn’t be a problem for these states.  When weater conditions due permit otherwise, of course, lower the limits to a safer speed to avoid accidents.

Now I know what you also might be thinking: “What about snow?”.  Surely this would cause problems for drivers in the winter.  Wouldn’t want to be slipping and sliding everywhere while trying to keep up with traffic flow.  That is why I would introduce this 80mph limit to be used on a seasonal basis.  Set a date in the spring on which the limit would be enforced and then drop it down to 75 on a particular date in late autumn.  This reduces crashes, saves lives, and keeps everybody happy.

It would be nice to have 80mph be the cruising speed.  Take these facts stated above and we can enforce this limit in more states.  The midwest is making headway.  Why not the rest of the country?
Sean Connery would be pleased with this customized Jaguar XJR.

Sean Connery would be pleased with this customized Jaguar XJR.

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Dashboard of the NEAR future Audi’s latest TT model will come out later this year, and what’s affixed behind the steering wheel will make driving it much more pleasurable than it has ever been before.


Audi’s next-generation Multi-Media interface system will display all digital inputs on a 12.3-inch LCD screen mounted where the dials should be.  You can find the control knob behind the stick, along with comparatively fewer buttons and a touchpad that allows you to narrow database searches by writing out the characters.



Also new are the improved climate controls.  Audi interior designers have given each vent an individual knob with a digital temperature readout.  This is much more handy than the typical red or blue indicators you usually see on temperature controls.


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Mint condition 1969 Shelby GT500 uncovered This car that was uncovered in a rural Pennsylvanian garage is truly a machine worthy of movie car chase scenes, especially ones with Steve McQueen at the wheel.


This immaculate 1969 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 was bought for $5,245 in 1969 and is now priced at nearly $100,000!  The homeowner says that the car has been sitting there since 1973 and he has not washed it for fear of scratching it.

1969 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500
The “Stang has a 428-cubic-inch (about 7.0L) Cobra Jet engine accompanied by a 4-speed manual transmission.

The car, along with an array of other spotless classics, will be auctioned off on April 25th.

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The immacualte 4-legged machine: the 2015 Ford Mustang

As anybody should know by now, the incredible Ford Mustang has turned 50 this year (cue “Happy Birthday” tune)!  Anybody who has ever owned one can relate to the experience they had driving it.

What’s so different about this one? Well the 5.0L V8 model has 420 raging horses under the hood accompanied by 396lb-ft of torque.  That’s enough to turn you back into a ten year-old child for almost a month.  You can choose your flavor of transmission, but honestly what’s so fun about driving a Mustang without a manual?

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Electric cars: the big question

     Perhaps they are the way of the future. Maybe if you were to take a DeLorean DMC-12 fifty years into the future you would observe that fuel pumps no longer exist. You might also note the strange silence that has replaced the typical grunting sound of a Ford diesel pickup. Even today the effect that the electric engine has had on the auto industry can be felt among us. Though they are not as popular, electric cars are still trying to make a stand in a world filled with exhaust fumes and obnoxious engine revs. And that could be worrying.
     The question to be asked here is this: is electric really the way to go? Most would quickly say, “Yes!” thinking only of the fuel costs they would avoid. I have to admit it would be fantastic if I could laugh at all the people standing in front of the pumps as I drove past them. But sadly, there is a price to pay.
     Take a look around any urban center and you will notice a major lack of charging points for electric cars. This might be a bit of a problem if you are sitting behind the wheel of a Nissan Leaf, realize that the nearest charging point is 30 miles away and the battery only has 20 miles of power left. Our infrastructure needs time to catch up with the growing demand of EV’s. So, like your iPhone, you’ll have to be cognizant of battery life and make sure you charge it up at home. Thus incurs another cost. In order to not have to wait for it to achieve a full charge, installing a special garage car charger would be wise. And a good one can run anywhere between seven and thirteen grand.
2013 Nissan Leaf
     AutoTrader.com claims the most affordable electric cars get roughly 75 miles of range before coughing. So if most of your driving habits involve rolling around town, quietly and efficiently is the way to do it. Though you will have to bum a ride with a friend if you want to go anywhere further than that.
     We all know the old saying, “All good things must come to an end.” Sadly, the “good thing” mentioned here is your electric battery. Eventually its juice will be used up and will need to be replaced, which will not be cheap. According to CNN.com electric car batteries go for about $12,000; about six times more than one used for a conventional combustion engine. This means that not long after the car leaves the dealership you will need to start saving up for it’s next battery; experts estimate they lose juice after about a decade.
     All electric car owners must also be mindful of the time it takes to actually reach a full charge. Dumping two hundred miles worth of fuel into the car’s tank in under five minutes will no longer be possible. Instead, electric cars take a few hours to reach a full charge, so day trips to go picnicking will have to be planned carefully. Remembering to plug it in at home wouldn’t be bad either. It just might save your neck.
2014 Tesla Model S
     The largest payment to be made for an electric car is, obviously, the car. EV’s only came onto the scene a few years ago so used ones are hard to come by. Presently a brand new and affordable one can cost anywhere between $30,000-$40,000, and they don’t get the best range. A base Tesla Model S get the best out of all of them – about 208 miles – but will cost much more. This just says that any consumer must really do the math before even considering purchasing one.

     Do the ends really outweigh the means? The EV experts like to think so. Predictably the electric car is the way of the future. The combustion engine that we’ve all become familiar with will be nonexistent in thirty, forty or fifty years. Maybe that’s the case, but now is not the time to jump to conclusions. I hereby suggest that if fuel savings without the whiplash is what you’re looking for, try a hybrid.

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Mint 1969 Shelby GT500 uncovered This car that was uncovered in a rural Pennsylvanian garage is truly a machine worthy of movie car chase scenes, especially ones with Steve McQueen at the wheel.  


This immaculate 1969 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 was bought for $5,245 in 1969 and is now priced at nearly $100,000!  The homeowner says that the car has been sitting there since 1973 and he has not washed it for fear of scratching it.

found-shelby-feature-660.jpgThe “Stang has a 428-cubic-inch (about 7.0L) Cobra Jet engine accompanied by a 4-speed manual transmission.

The car, along with an array of other spotless classics, will be auctioned off on April 25th.

WOW factor: The new Bentley SUV

It’s called the EXP 9 and, currently, it is still a concept.  This means the Germans can still do whatever they want to change the design and WOW us even more.  However they do wish to put it’s top speed at - get this - 200 MPH!  This means that aerodynamics will be at the top of their list when trying to achieve this feat.

A new staple to the luxury SUV lineup.

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Electric cars: the big question

carsandetc:

A Lotus Eclat Sprint

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News and reviews tailored for the car junkie in you.

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